Calopogon tuberosus

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Common Names: tuberosus grasspink [1], Grass Pink Orchid [2]

Calopogon tuberosus
Calopogon tuberosus AFP.jpg
Photo by the Atlas of Florida Plants Database
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Liliopsida - Moncots
Order: Orchidales
Family: Orchidaceae
Genus: Calopogon
Species: C. tuberosus
Binomial name
Calopogon tuberosus
L
CALO TUBE DIST.JPG
Natural range of Calopogon tuberosus from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Taxonomic Notes

Synonyms: C. pulchellus (R. Brown), Limodorum tuberosum (Linnaeus)

Varieties: none

Description

C. tuberosus is a perennial forb/herb in the Orchidaceae family native to North America. [1]


Distribution

Found along the east coast of the United States and Canada into the center of North America, the C. tuberosus is common in savannas, sandhill seeps, and in bogs within mountain regions. [3]

Ecology

Habitat

C. tuberosus is common in savannas, sandhill seeps, floating peat mats, and other regions during April to September. [3]

A variety of habitats that this orchid can been found include, marl prairies, pine flatwoods, roadsides, fens, and bogs. [4]

Specimens of C. tuberosus have been collected from moist loamy sand of savanna like longleaf pine regions, and wet seepage areas. [5]


Seed bank and germination

Generally, warmer temperatures produce more seedling germination for the C. tuberosus with the exception of Michigan where cooler temperatures resulted in more germination. Also, fluctuating temperatures are more beneficial than stagnant temperatures. [6]

Pollination

C. tuberosus does not provide a benefit to pollinators, due to this aspect they use deceit to get pollinators to come. Bees land on fake stamens which causes the structure to collapse and transfer pollen to the bee. .[7]

Conservation and Management

In 2015, the C. tuberosus was considered endangered in the Illinois region. [8]

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 USDA Plant Database
  2. Board, I. E. S. P. (2015). "CHECKLIST OF ILLINOIS ENDANGERED AND THREATENED ANIMALS AND PLANTS." Illinois List of Endangered and Threatened Species: 1-16.
  3. 3.0 3.1 [Weakley, A. S. (2015). Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States. Chapel Hill, NC, University of North Carolina Herbarium.]
  4. Kauth, P. J., et al. (2011). "Comparative in vitro germination ecology of Calopogon tuberosus var. tuberosus (Orchidaceae) across its geographic range." The Society for In Vitro Biology: 148-156.
  5. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: June 2018. Collectors: Loran C. Anderson, R.A. Norris, Rodie White, R.K. Godfrey, R. Komarek. States and counties: Florida (Wakulla, Taylor, Liberty, Leon, Jackson) Georgia (Grady, Thomas)
  6. [Kauth, P. J., et al. (2011). "Comparative in vitro germination ecology of Calopogon tuberosus var. tuberosus (Orchidaceae) across its geographic range." The Society for In Vitro Biology: 148-156.]
  7. Explained by Roger Hammer, May 2018, posted to Florida Flora and Ecosystematics Facebook Group May 20, 2018.
  8. [Board, I. E. S. P. (2015). "CHECKLIST OF ILLINOIS ENDANGERED AND THREATENED ANIMALS AND PLANTS." Illinois List of Endangered and Threatened Species: 1-16.]