Rudbeckia fulgida

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Common names: Orange coneflower, eared coneflower [1], black-eyed Susan [2]

Rudbeckia fulgida
Rudbeckia fulgida FI.jpg
Photo by Chris Evans, University of Illinois, Bugwood.org hosted at Forestryimages.org
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida - Dicots
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Rudbeckia
Species: R. fulgida
Binomial name
Rudbeckia fulgida
Aiton
RUDB FULG DIST.JPG
Natural range of Rudbeckia fulgida from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Taxonomic Notes

Synonym: R. acuminata(C.L. Boynton & Beadle), R. foliosa (C.L. Boynton & Beadle), R. truncata (Small)

Variety: Rudbeckia fulgida var. spathulata (Michaux)Perdue, Rudbeckia fulgida var. speciosa (Wendroth) Perdue, Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii (C.L. Boynton & Beadle), Rudbeckia fulgida var. umbrosa (C.L. Boynton & Beadle)

Description

R. fulgida is a perennial forb/herb of the Asteraceae family that is native to North America. [1]

Distribution

R. fulgida is found specifically in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Tennessee, Illinois, Missouri, and Alabama.[1]

Ecology

Habitat

R. fulgida is found in habitats of dry to wet meadows with some varieties found in bottomlands, bogs, moist forests and woodlands, and calcareous slopes. [3]

R. fulgida have been found in environments with loamy sand or chaulky clay, pine woods, hardwoods bording lakes, wet hammock, open limestone glade, and rocky wooded bluffs. [4]

Phenology

R. fulgida has been observed to flower in Janurary, February, April, May, July, and September. [5]

Conservation and Management

R. fulgida is considered rare in Indiana and endangered in New Jersey. [1]

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 USDA Plant Database
  2. Davis, J., J. Eric, et al. (2002). "Vascular flora of Piedmont Prairies: Evidence from several prairie remnants." Castanea 67(1): 1-12.
  3. Weakley, A. S. (2015). Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States. Chapel Hill, NC, University of North Carolina Herbarium.
  4. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: June 2018. Collectors: Loran Anderson, Mark Garland, R.K. Godfrey, A.H. Curtis, John Nelson, Richard Houk, R. Kral, Ann Johnson, Wilson Baker, Robert Farley, Shelly Sparks. States and counties: Florida (Wakulla, Dixie, Jackson, Taylor, Gadsden, Jefferson, Charlotte) Georgia (Thomas) Alabama (Cherokee) Tennessee (Marion)
  5. Nelson, G. PanFlora: Plant data for the eastern United States with emphasis on the Southeastern Coastal Plains, Florida, and the Florida Panhandle. www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ Accessed: 29 MAY 2018