Quercus inopina

From Coastal Plain Plants Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Quercus inopina
Quer inop.jpg
Photo by Mark A. Garland, hosted by the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Order: Fagales
Family: Fagaceae
Genus: Quercus
Species: Q. inopina
Binomial name
Quercus inopina
Ashe
Quer inop dist.jpg
Natural range of Quercus inopina from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Common names: Sandhill oak, Florida scrub oak

Taxonomic notes

Description

A description of Quercus inopina is provided in The Flora of North America.

This species is very similar to Q. myrtifolia how ever they can be distinguished in areas of sympatry by soil. Q. inopia occupies nutrient poor soil of St. Lucie type, while Q. myrtifolia occupies slightly more nutrient rich soils on yellow sands of the Paola or Lake variety.[1]

Distribution

Q. inopina is endemic to Florida, in the xeric, nutrient poor sands of ancient dunes.[2]

Ecology

Habitat

Habitats of Q. inopina include sand pine-evergreen scrubs, dry slash pine flatwoods, and longleaf pine/scrub oak communities in central Florida.[3] Associated species include Quercus chapmanii, Q. geminata, Q. myrtifolia, Fraxinus floridana, Ilex arenicola, and Persea humilis. It composes 30 to 40% of the cover in scrubby flatwoods.[1]

Phenology

It has been observed flowering in April and fruiting in August.[3] Acorns mature in two years, with the cup covering half of the nut, and the pubescent cup scales.[4]

Fire ecology

Approximately 70% of the biomass of Q. inopina is belowground, consisting of a network of branching and anastomosing rhizomes which vertical stems arise in clusters. The allocation of this much biomass below ground allows this species to resprout from rhizomes after fire, within 3 years postfire, the oak may regain its pre-burn cover.[1]

Pollination

The following Hymenoptera families and species were observed visiting flowers of Quercus inopina at Archbold Biological Station: [5]

Apidae: Apis mellifera, Bombus impatiens

Colletidae: Colletes brimleyi

Conservation and management

This species in endemic to central Florida along ancient dunes. Even with it's habitat degrading, the local abundance on protected land causes it to not be considered vulnerable.[6]

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

Florida State University Robert K. Godfrey Herbarium database. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: November 2015. Collectors: Loran C. Anderson, H.S. Conard, Robert K. Godfrey, Ann F. Johnson, John G. Rae. States and Counties: Alabama: Baldwin. Florida: Highlands, Manatee, Martin, Osceola, Polk, St. Lucie. Compiled by Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Johnson, A. F. and W. G. Abrahamson (2002). "Stem Turnover in the Rhizomatous Scrub Oak, Quercus Inopina, from South-Central Florida." The American Midland Naturalist 147(2): 237-246.
  2. [[1]]Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed: March 7, 2016
  3. 3.0 3.1 Florida State University Robert K. Godfrey Herbarium database. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: November 2015. Collectors: Loran C. Anderson, H.S. Conard, Robert K. Godfrey, Ann F. Johnson, John G. Rae. States and Counties: Alabama: Baldwin. Florida: Highlands, Manatee, Martin, Osceola, Polk, St. Lucie. Compiled by Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy
  4. [[2]]University of Florida Extension. Accessed: March 4, 2016
  5. Deyrup, M.A. and N.D. 2015. Database of observations of Hymenoptera visitations to flowers of plants on Archbold Biological Station, Florida, USA.
  6. [[3]]Accessed: March 7, 2016