Panicum verrucosum

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Panicum verrucosum
Pani verr.jpg
Photo by Guy Anglin, Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Liliopsida – Monocotyledons
Order: Poales
Family: Poaceae ⁄ Gramineae
Genus: Panicum
Species: P. verrucosum
Binomial name
Panicum verrucosum
Muhl.
PANI VERR dist.jpg
Natural range of Panicum verrucosum from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Common name: Warty panicgrass

Taxonomic notes

Description

Panicum verrucosum is an annual graminoid species. [1]

Distribution

Ecology

Habitat

P. verrucosum occurs in moist to wet, sandy or loamy soils, including sandy loam, loamy sand, and sandy peat. [2] It can be found in pine-wiregrass savannas, wooded floodplains, pond pine-titi peat swamps, sandhills, cabbage palm-mixed hardwood hammocks, and bordering bodies of water, including Cypress-gum ponds, lakes, Hypericum bogs, and ephemeral depression marshes. [2] Furthermore, this species appears in some disturbed areas, including near trails and borrow pits, and in ditches, clear-cuts, and power line corridors. [2] Associated species include Pinus palustris, Andropogon ternarius, Muhlenbergia expansa, Aristida stricta, Cyrilla, Ilex, Myrica, Cypress, Liquidambar styraciflua, Hypericum, Xyris, Rhynchospora, Schizachrium, Eupatorium, Scleria, Plea, and Zigadenus. [2]

Phenology

Flowering and fruiting have been observed in June, September, October, and December. [2]

Seed dispersal

This species is thought to be dispersed by gravity. [3]

Seed bank and germination

The species showed a significant increase in abundance after tilling (soil disturbance), and was abundant in seed banks. [1] Germination depends on exposed soil and possibly disturbance caused by drought. [4]

Fire ecology

P. verrucosum is found in cut-burned areas of a Chamaecyparis thyoides stand in the Great Dismal Swamp. [5]

Conservation and management

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Kirkman, L. K. and R. R. Sharitz (1994). "Vegetation disturbance and maintenance of diversity in intermittently flooded Carolina bays in South Carolina." Ecological Applications 4: 177-188.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Florida State University Robert K. Godfrey Herbarium database. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: June 2014. Collectors: Loran C. Anderson, John B. Nelson, Sidney McDaniel, L. J. Brass, Paul O. Schallert, R. Kral, R.K. Godfrey, James P. Gillespie, Angus Gholson, A. H. Curtiss, D. B. Ward, J. Hunter, F. S. Ward, Cecil Slaughter, R. A. Norris, and R. Komarek. States and Counties: Florida: Alachua, Baker, Calhoun, Duval, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Highlands, Jefferson, Lafayette, Leon, Liberty, Nassau, Okaloosa, Osceola, Putnam, Seminole, Taylor, Wakulla, and Walton. Georgia: Atkinson, Grady, and Thomas.
  3. Kirkman, L. Katherine. Unpublished database of seed dispersal mode of plants found in Coastal Plain longleaf pine-grasslands of the Jones Ecological Research Center, Georgia.
  4. Kirkman, L. K. and R. R. Sharitz (1994). "Vegetation disturbance and maintenance of diversity in intermittently flooded Carolina bays in South Carolina." Ecological Applications 4: 177-188.
  5. McKinley, C. E. and F. P. Day (1979). "Herbaceous production in cut-burned, uncut-burned and control areas of chamaecyparis thyoides (L.) BSP (Cupressaceae) stand in the Great Dismal Swamp." Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 106: 20-28.