Euphorbia discoidalis

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Euphorbia discoidalis
Euphorbia discoidales 2.jpg
Photo taken by Kevin Robertson
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Order: Euphorbiales
Family: Euphorbiaceae
Genus: Euphorbia
Species: E. discoidalis
Binomial name
Euphorbia discoidalis
Chapm.
EUPH DISC dist.jpg
Natural range of Euphorbia discoidalis from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Common name: Summer spurge

Taxonomic notes

Synonyms: Tithymalopsis discoidalis (Chapman) Small; E. corollata var. corollata

Description

Distribution

Ecology

Habitat

Habitats of E. discoidalis include pine dominated habitats such as longleaf pine scrubs, sandhills, upland pine, and drained uplands. It prefers areas that have high light level/ open canopies. It also occurs in disturbed habitats such as fallow fields, clearings, and in annually burned pinelands. It likes sandy soil types.[1] Euphorbia discoidalis is restricted to native groundcover with a statistical affinity in upland pinelands of South Georgia.[2] Populations appear to increase due to disturbance.[3]

Associated species include longleaf pine, slash pine, shortleaf pine, oaks, red oak, mockernut hickory, magnolia.[1]

Phenology

It flowers from late August to frost.[4] This species has been observed flowering in August and September.[1]

Fire ecology

This species is found in areas that are burned annually such as longleaf pine-wiregrass savannas and sandhills.[1] It responds positively to fire. Kral (1983) writes "In naturally stocked uplands it increases as a result of woods fires which reduce competing woody vegetation." [4]

Conservation and management

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Florida State University Robert K. Godfrey Herbarium database. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: June 2014. Collectors: R. A. Norris, R. Komarek, Andre F. Clewell, Robert K. Godfrey, Jefferson, R. Komarek, Loran C. Anderson, Travis MacClendon, Karen McClendon, G. Wilder, Ann F. Johnson, Wilson Baker, and G. Wilder. States and Counties: Florida: Calhoun, Jackson, Leon. Georgia: Thomas.
  2. Ostertag, T.E., and K.M. Robertson. 2007. A comparison of native versus old-field vegetation in upland pinelands managed with frequent fire, South Georgia, USA. Pages 109–120 in R.E. Masters and K.E.M. Galley (eds.). Proceedings of the 23rd Tall Timbers Fire Ecology Conference: Fire in Grassland and Shrubland Ecosystems.
  3. Kral, R. (1983). Euphorbia discoidalis Chapman. A report on some rare, threatened or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South. R. Kral. Atlanta, USDA Forest Service, Paper 228: 701-705.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Kral, R. (1983). Euphorbia discoidalis Chapman. A report on some rare, threatened or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South. R. Kral. Atlanta, USDA Forest Service, Paper 228: 701-705.