Cyperus plukenetii

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Cyperus plukenetii
Cype pluk.jpg
Photo taken by Kevin Robertson
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Liliopsida – Monocotyledons
Order: Poales
Family: Cyperaceae
Genus: Cyperus
Species: C. plukenetii
Binomial name
Cyperus plukenetii
Fernald
CYPE PLUK dist.jpg
Natural range of Cyperus plukenetii from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Common names: Plukenet's flatsedge; starburst flatsedge

Taxonomic notes

Synonyms: C. retrofractus var. retrofactus, C. retrofactus

Varieties: none

Description

A description of Cyperus plukenetii is provided in The Flora of North America. Cyperus plukenetii is a perennial graminoid. Individual plants have numerous stems, each with a cormose base; and the bases are tightly bunched together. [1]

Distribution

Ecology

Habitat

C. plukenetii requires sandy soils.[2] It also prefers higher light levels, from open to semi-open conditions. [1] It is found in sparse scrub woods, woods' edges, and open fields.[3] Other habitat types include dry pine and oak lands, scrub oak sandhills, turkey oak-longleaf pine barrens, open hardwood stands, open upland pine forests, and river banks, but it is infrequent in open stands of longleaf pine and wiregrass. [1] It also has been found in disturbed areas, including bulldozed scrub oak sandhills, cut-over longleaf pine-turkey oak sand ridges and flatwoods, pasture fence lines, young pine plantations, and roadsides. [1]

Associated species include Liatris, Agalinis, Chrysopsis, Aristida stricta, Phoebanthus tenuifolias, Eupatorium album, Pteridium aquilinum var. pseudacaidatum, Serenoa repens, Quercus margaretta, Q. minima, Q. ellottii. [1]

Seed dispersal

It can be dispersed in a variety of ways: rain wash, transport of achenes in mud on feet of migratory waterfowl,[4] ingestion of fruits by migratory waterfowl,[5] and flotation of achenes (Chermezon 1924; Ridley 1930; Lye 1981)[6]It also uses animals as dispersal agents by attaching to their fur by spikelets.[2] This species is thought to be dispersed by gravity. [7]

Fire ecology

This species is fire tolerant and has been found on annually burned pinelands. [1]

Conservation and management

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Florida State University Robert K. Godfrey Herbarium database. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: June 2014. Collectors: A. H. Curtiss, R. Kral, R.K. Godfrey, Gary R. Knight, George R. Cooley, Richard J. Eaton, R. F. Doren, R L Lazor, V. Sullivan, Holly Maurushat, Richard S. Mitchell, Loran C. Anderson, Andre F. Clewell, and Kevin Oakes. States and Counties: Florida: Calhoun, Duval, Hernando, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Marion, Okaloosa, Taylor, Wakulla, and Walton. Georgia: Baker, Grady, and Marion.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Carter, R. (1993). "Animal dispersal of the North American Sedge, Cyperus plukenetii (Cyperaceae)." American Midland Naturalist 129: 352-356.
  3. CARTER, R. 1984. A systematic study of the New World species of section Umbellati of Cyperus. Unpubl. Ph.D. Thesis, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 279 p. Carter, R. (1993). "Animal dispersal of the North American Sedge, Cyperus plukenetii (Cyperaceae)." American Midland Naturalist 129: 352-356.
  4. RIDLEY, H. N. 1930. The dispersal of plants throughout the world. L. Reeve & Co., Ltd., Ashford, Kent. 744 p. Carter, R. (1993). "Animal dispersal of the North American Sedge, Cyperus plukenetii (Cyperaceae)." American Midland Naturalist 129: 352-356.
  5. RIDLEY, H. N. 1930. The dispersal of plants throughout the world. L. Reeve & Co., Ltd., Ashford, Kent. 744 p. BEND, G. 1937. Eigenartige verbreitung-seinrichtungen bei der Cyperaceen gattung Gahnia. Flora, 131:369-386. Carter, R. (1993). "Animal dispersal of the North American Sedge, Cyperus plukenetii (Cyperaceae)." American Midland Naturalist 129: 352-356.
  6. CHERMEZON, H. 1924. Sur la dissemination de quelques Cyperacees. Bull. Soc. Bot. France, 71:849- 861. RIDLEY, H. N. 1930. The dispersal of plants throughout the world. L. Reeve & Co., Ltd., Ashford, Kent. 744 p. LYE, K. A. 1981. Studies in African Cyperaceae 19. The genera of Anosporum Nees and Sorostachys Steudel. Nord. J. Bot., 1:186-191.
  7. Kirkman, L. Katherine. Unpublished database of seed dispersal mode of plants found in Coastal Plain longleaf pine-grasslands of the Jones Ecological Research Center, Georgia.