Agrimonia microcarpa

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Agrimonia microcarpa
Agrimonia microcarpa Gil.jpg
Photo was taken by Gil Nelson
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida - Dicotyledons
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Agrimonia
Species: A. microcarpa
Binomial name
Agrimonia microcarpa
Wallr.
AGRI MICR dist.jpg
Natural range of Agrimonia microcarpa from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Common names: Smallfruit agrimony; Low agrimony

Taxonomic notes

Synonyms: A. pubescens var. microcarpa (Wallroth) H.E. Ahles; A. microcarpa; A. platycarpa Wallroth

Description

A description of Agrimonia microcarpa is provided in The Flora of North America. Agrimonia microcarpa has been recognized as a distinct species or as a variety of Agrimonia pubescens.[1] Both taxa share the same types of distribution of hairs, have flowers alternate on the inflorescence rachis and tuberous roots.[2]

Distribution

It occurs within the mid to southeastern coastal region of the United States – and some adjacent areas. [3] [2]

In Florida, it is found in the northern panhandle and down to the central peninsula.[4]

Ecology

Habitat

Agrimonia microcarpa is found frequently in mesic sites of open deciduous and mixed woods,[2][5][4] limestone bluffs, wooded slopes around sinkholes, shallow wooded ravines, and along the sparsely wooded ecotone borders of limestone glades.[6] Disturbed habitats include old roadways and clear-cut forests. It generally prefers shady to partially shady sites with moist sandy loam soil. In Alachua County, FL, it was observed in moist upland hardwood forests, slope forests, and creek floodplains.[7]

Associated species includes Fimbristylis, Sabatia, Asclepias verticillata, Ratibida pinnata, Quercus laevis, Pinus palustris, and others.[6]

Phenology

Agrimonia microcarpa has been observed flowering in April and from late July to September.[8][2] Fruiting observed July through November.[9]

Conservation and management

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. Ahles 1964, more citation needed.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Sorensen, G. J. K. a. P. D. (2008). "A revision of Agrimonia (Rosaceae) in North and Central America." Brittonia: 11-33.
  3. Kline, G. J. and P. D. Sorensen (2008). "A revision of Agrimonia (Rosaceae) in North and Central America." Brittonia: 11-33.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Wunderlin, Richard P. and Bruce F. Hansen. Guide to the Vascular Plants of Florida. Second edition. 2003. University Press of Florida: Gainesville/Tallahassee/Tampa/Boca Raton/Pensacola/Orlando/Miami/Jacksonville/Ft. Myers. 579. Print.
  5. Nelson 2006 – Atlantic Coastal Plain Widlflowers: A Field Guide to the Wildflower of the Coastal Regions of Viriginia, North Carolina, South Georgia, and Northeastern Florida. Guilford, CT: FalconGuide, 2006. 201. Print.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Florida State University Robert K. Godfrey Herbarium database. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: June 2014. Collectors: Robert K. Godfrey, Robert Kral, D. B. Ward, Loran C. Anderson, J. Nelson, Gary R. Knight, Richard S. Mitchell, S. J. Ward, Gwynn W. Ramsey, R. F. Thorne, R. A. Davidson, Wilson Baker, Ed Keppner, and Lisa Keppner. States and Counties: Florida: Gadsden, Alachua, Leon, Liberty, Jackson, Union, Suwannee, Wakulla, and Bay.
  7. Observation by Loretta Grace in Alachua County, FL, September 28, 2017, posted to Florida Flora and Ecosystematics Facebook Group September 28, 2017.
  8. Nelson, G. PanFlora: Plant data for the eastern United States with emphasis on the Southeastern Coastal Plains, Florida, and the Florida Panhandle. www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ Accessed: 7 DEC 2016
  9. Florida State University Robert K. Godfrey Herbarium database. URL: http://herbarium.bio.fsu.edu. Last accessed: June 2014. Collectors: Robert K. Godfrey, Robert Kral, D. B. Ward, Loran C. Anderson, J. Nelson, Gary R. Knight, Richard S. Mitchell, S. J. Ward, Gwynn W. Ramsey, R. F. Thorne, R. A. Davidson, Wilson Baker, Ed Keppner, and Lisa Keppner. States and Counties: Florida: Gadsden, Alachua, Leon, Liberty, Jackson, Union, Suwannee, Wakulla, and Bay.