Difference between revisions of "Rhexia petiolata"

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===Habitat=== <!--Natural communities, human disturbed habitats, topography, hydrology, soils, light, fire regime requirements for removal of competition, etc.-->
 
===Habitat=== <!--Natural communities, human disturbed habitats, topography, hydrology, soils, light, fire regime requirements for removal of competition, etc.-->
 
''R. petiolata'' proliferates in wet pine flatwoods and savannas, pocosin borders, and ditches. <ref name= "Weakley 2015"> Weakley, A. S. (2015). Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States. Chapel Hill, NC, University of North Carolina Herbarium. </ref> ''R. petiolata'' responds positively to soil disturbance by heavy silvilculture in North Carolina.<ref>Cohen, S., R. Braham, and F. Sanchez. (2004). Seed Bank Viability in Disturbed Longleaf Pine Sites. Restoration Ecology 12(4):503-515.</ref> It does not respond to soil disturbance by clearcutting and chopping in North Florida flatwoods forests.<ref>Moore, W.H., B.F. Swindel, and W.S. Terry. (1982). Vegetative Response to Clearcutting and Chopping in a North Florida Flatwoods Forest. Journal of Range Management 35(2):214-218.</ref>
 
''R. petiolata'' proliferates in wet pine flatwoods and savannas, pocosin borders, and ditches. <ref name= "Weakley 2015"> Weakley, A. S. (2015). Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States. Chapel Hill, NC, University of North Carolina Herbarium. </ref> ''R. petiolata'' responds positively to soil disturbance by heavy silvilculture in North Carolina.<ref>Cohen, S., R. Braham, and F. Sanchez. (2004). Seed Bank Viability in Disturbed Longleaf Pine Sites. Restoration Ecology 12(4):503-515.</ref> It does not respond to soil disturbance by clearcutting and chopping in North Florida flatwoods forests.<ref>Moore, W.H., B.F. Swindel, and W.S. Terry. (1982). Vegetative Response to Clearcutting and Chopping in a North Florida Flatwoods Forest. Journal of Range Management 35(2):214-218.</ref>
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''Rhexia petiolata'' is an indicator species for the Panhandle Seepage Savannas community type as described in Carr et al. (2010).<ref>Carr, S.C., K.M. Robertson, and R.K. Peet. 2010. A vegetation classification of fire-dependent pinelands of Florida. Castanea 75:153-189.</ref>
  
 
===Phenology=== <!--Timing off flowering, fruiting, seed dispersal, and environmental triggers.  Cite PanFlora website if appropriate: http://www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ -->
 
===Phenology=== <!--Timing off flowering, fruiting, seed dispersal, and environmental triggers.  Cite PanFlora website if appropriate: http://www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ -->

Latest revision as of 14:32, 1 August 2020

Common name: ciliate meadow-beauty [1], short-stemmed meadow-beauty [1], fringed meadowbeauty [2]

Rhexia petiolata
Rhexia petiolata SEF.jpg
Photo by John Gwaltney hosted at Southeastern Flora.com
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida - Dicots
Order: Myrtales
Family: Melastomataceae
Genus: Rhexia
Species: R. petiolata
Binomial name
Rhexia petiolatas
Walter
RHEX PETI DIST.JPG
Natural range of Rhexia petiolata from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Taxonomic Notes

Synonyms: R. ciliosa Michaux

Varieties: none

Description

R. petiolata is a perennial forb/herb of the Melastomataceae family native to North America. [2]

Distribution

R. petiolata is found along the southeastern coast of the United States from Texas to Maryland. [2]

Ecology

Habitat

R. petiolata proliferates in wet pine flatwoods and savannas, pocosin borders, and ditches. [1] R. petiolata responds positively to soil disturbance by heavy silvilculture in North Carolina.[3] It does not respond to soil disturbance by clearcutting and chopping in North Florida flatwoods forests.[4]

Rhexia petiolata is an indicator species for the Panhandle Seepage Savannas community type as described in Carr et al. (2010).[5]

Phenology

R. petiolata has been observed to flower June through October. [6]

Conservation and Management

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Weakley, A. S. (2015). Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States. Chapel Hill, NC, University of North Carolina Herbarium.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 USDA Plant Database https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=RHPE
  3. Cohen, S., R. Braham, and F. Sanchez. (2004). Seed Bank Viability in Disturbed Longleaf Pine Sites. Restoration Ecology 12(4):503-515.
  4. Moore, W.H., B.F. Swindel, and W.S. Terry. (1982). Vegetative Response to Clearcutting and Chopping in a North Florida Flatwoods Forest. Journal of Range Management 35(2):214-218.
  5. Carr, S.C., K.M. Robertson, and R.K. Peet. 2010. A vegetation classification of fire-dependent pinelands of Florida. Castanea 75:153-189.
  6. Nelson, G. PanFlora: Plant data for the eastern United States with emphasis on the Southeastern Coastal Plains, Florida, and the Florida Panhandle. www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ Accessed: 29 MAY 2018