Difference between revisions of "Gaylussacia frondosa"

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===Habitat=== <!--Natural communities, human disturbed habitats, topography, hydrology, soils, light, fire regime requirements for removal of competition, etc.-->
 
===Habitat=== <!--Natural communities, human disturbed habitats, topography, hydrology, soils, light, fire regime requirements for removal of competition, etc.-->
 
''Gaylussacia frondosa'' is restricted to native groundcover with a statistical affinity in upland pinelands of South Georgia. <ref name=or07> Ostertag, T.E., and K.M. Robertson. 2007. A comparison of native versus old-field vegetation in upland pinelands managed with frequent fire, South Georgia, USA. Pages 109–120 in R.E. Masters and K.E.M. Galley (eds.). Proceedings of the 23rd Tall Timbers Fire Ecology Conference: Fire in Grassland and Shrubland Ecosystems.</ref> When exposed to soil disturbance by military training in West Georgia, ''G. frondosa'' responds negatively by way of absence.<ref>Dale, V.H., S.C. Beyeler, and B. Jackson. (2002). Understory vegetation indicators of anthropogenic disturbance in longleaf pine forests at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA. Ecological Indicators 1(3):155-170.</ref>
 
''Gaylussacia frondosa'' is restricted to native groundcover with a statistical affinity in upland pinelands of South Georgia. <ref name=or07> Ostertag, T.E., and K.M. Robertson. 2007. A comparison of native versus old-field vegetation in upland pinelands managed with frequent fire, South Georgia, USA. Pages 109–120 in R.E. Masters and K.E.M. Galley (eds.). Proceedings of the 23rd Tall Timbers Fire Ecology Conference: Fire in Grassland and Shrubland Ecosystems.</ref> When exposed to soil disturbance by military training in West Georgia, ''G. frondosa'' responds negatively by way of absence.<ref>Dale, V.H., S.C. Beyeler, and B. Jackson. (2002). Understory vegetation indicators of anthropogenic disturbance in longleaf pine forests at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA. Ecological Indicators 1(3):155-170.</ref>
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''Gaylussacia frondosa'' var. ''nana'' is frequent and abundant in the Upper Panhandle Savannas community type as described in Carr et al. (2010).<ref>Carr, S.C., K.M. Robertson, and R.K. Peet. 2010. A vegetation classification of fire-dependent pinelands of Florida. Castanea 75:153-189.</ref>
  
 
===Phenology=== <!--Timing off flowering, fruiting, seed dispersal, and environmental triggers.  Cite PanFlora website if appropriate: http://www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ -->
 
===Phenology=== <!--Timing off flowering, fruiting, seed dispersal, and environmental triggers.  Cite PanFlora website if appropriate: http://www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ -->

Latest revision as of 13:31, 31 July 2020

Gaylussacia frondosa
Gayl fron.jpg
Photo by Dwight K. Lauer, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Tracheophyta- Vascular plants
Class: Magnoliopsida - Dicotyledons
Order: Ericales
Family: Ericaceae
Genus: Gaylussacia
Species: G. frondosa
Binomial name
Gaylussacia frondosa
(L.)Torr. & A. Gray
Gayl fron dist.jpg
Natural range of Gaylussacia frondosa from USDA NRCS Plants Database.

Common names: Blue huckleberry, Dangleberry

Taxonomic notes

Synonyms: Gaylussacia frondosa var. frondosa; Decachaena frondosa (Linnaeus) Torrey & Gray

Description

A description of Gaylussacia frondosa is provided in The Flora of North America.

Distribution

Ecology

Habitat

Gaylussacia frondosa is restricted to native groundcover with a statistical affinity in upland pinelands of South Georgia. [1] When exposed to soil disturbance by military training in West Georgia, G. frondosa responds negatively by way of absence.[2]

Gaylussacia frondosa var. nana is frequent and abundant in the Upper Panhandle Savannas community type as described in Carr et al. (2010).[3]

Phenology

G. frondosa has been observed to flower in April.[4]

Seed dispersal

This species is thought to be dispersed by consumption by vertebrates. [5]

Conservation and management

Cultivation and restoration

Photo Gallery

References and notes

  1. Ostertag, T.E., and K.M. Robertson. 2007. A comparison of native versus old-field vegetation in upland pinelands managed with frequent fire, South Georgia, USA. Pages 109–120 in R.E. Masters and K.E.M. Galley (eds.). Proceedings of the 23rd Tall Timbers Fire Ecology Conference: Fire in Grassland and Shrubland Ecosystems.
  2. Dale, V.H., S.C. Beyeler, and B. Jackson. (2002). Understory vegetation indicators of anthropogenic disturbance in longleaf pine forests at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA. Ecological Indicators 1(3):155-170.
  3. Carr, S.C., K.M. Robertson, and R.K. Peet. 2010. A vegetation classification of fire-dependent pinelands of Florida. Castanea 75:153-189.
  4. Nelson, G. PanFlora: Plant data for the eastern United States with emphasis on the Southeastern Coastal Plains, Florida, and the Florida Panhandle. www.gilnelson.com/PanFlora/ Accessed: 9 DEC 2016
  5. Kirkman, L. Katherine. Unpublished database of seed dispersal mode of plants found in Coastal Plain longleaf pine-grasslands of the Jones Ecological Research Center, Georgia.